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OTAGO FARMERS MARKET

The soup is simmering away ready and waiting – Organicland’s osso bucco beef bones are the base for this hearty, soulful soup.  I have added a selection of market veges and a handful of barley for good measure.  This is not only perfect for the oncoming cold weather it is also perfect on the pocket.
I will also be making a wonderful one pot meal using Waitaki Bacon and Ham, pork and fennel sausages which are so delicious and versatile.  Today i will be simply adding some potatoes and a few bits and pieces and before you know it you will be sitting down to yet another satisfying meal (perfect for the weekend).
Red cabbage is on the menu and i say lets bring it back! It adds such a wonderful brightness to any meal that it can only be a warm welcome on the dark, cold nights, i will be adding a drop or two of Green Mans cider and a scattering of freshly harvested hazelnuts – perfect!
Finally on our menu today are Quince! The more you cook with them the more you love them, the floral aroma fulls your kitchen with dreamy perfumes and the colour when cooked turns into a nectar, peachy colour.  I have been making jelly, jams, and membrillo (paste) and today i will be poaching them and enjoying them with cream.

Levitio Bakery

Can’t wait to see you all at the mobile kitchen.

Just another wonderful day at the farmers market

HEARTY BEEF AND BARLEY SOUP


This soup is a fantastic way to use up bits and pieces – I am using organic beef bones from Organic Land which give this soup a wonderful, comforting flavour.

Serves 6-8

2-4 beef soup bones
4 stalks celery, diced


1 onion, diced


4 carrots, diced


2 leeks, sliced thinly


½ swede, peeled and diced


1 cup barley


Salt and pepper


4 sprigs fresh thyme


1 bay leaf


Generous handful fresh parsley, chopped
Method


Place the bones in a large pot, cover with cold water and bring to the boil, remove any scum that has risen to the top and reduce the temperature to a gentle simmer.

Add the herbs, onion, light part of the leek and carrots.  Simmer away for 1 ½ hours.  Add the swede, and barley season with salt and pepper and cook for a further 30 minutes or until the barley and swede are tender. Adjust the seasoning you may find you need to add a generous amount to salt.


Remove the bones and pick off any meat and return it to the soup, discard the bones.  Add the chopped parsley and serve.

BRAISED RED CABBAGE WITH CIDER AND HAZELNUTS

Warming flavours of autumn combined with the crunch of freshly harvested nuts is quite simple delicious!

50 ml olive oil
1 onion, thinly sliced
2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 tsp caraway seeds
½ red cabbage (about 700g), thinly sliced
150ml cider
100ml red wine or cider vinegar
100g (1/2 cup firmly packed) brown sugar
100g hazelnuts, lightly roasted

Method


Heat olive oil in a large saucepan. Add onion, garlic and caraway seeds stir occasionally over medium heat until soft (7-10 minutes). Add cabbage and stir occasionally (8-10 minutes). Add cider, vinegar and sugar, stir to combine and cook until liquid has almost evaporated (20-25 minutes), season to taste.  Lightly crush the toasted hazelnuts and scatter over the cabbage.  Serve.
It is great with all meats, duck and game.

TURKISH RED CABBAGE SALAD

Serves 4-6


½ red cabbage, sliced thinly


1 Tbsp salt

Dressing

50 ml extra virgin olive oil
½ lemon
Salt and pepper

Yoghurt Sauce


½ cup plain yoghurt


1-2 cloves garlic, minced with pinch of salt
Paprika Oil

2 Tbsp olive oil
Generous pinch paprika and cayenne pepper

Method


Remove the thick white core in the centre of the cabbage and discard.  Slice the remaining cabbage as thin as possible. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of salt and massage into the cabbage, leave for at least 30 minutes to 1 hour.  Rinse under cold water and drain well.
Make the dressing and toss through the cabbage and place into a serving dish.


Mix the yoghurt with the garlic and drizzle on top.


Warm the oil in a small pan or saucepan add the paprika and cayenne pepper and warm through.  Pour over the yoghurt and serve.

WAITAKI’S PORK AND FENNEL SAUSAGES WITH POTATOES

This is one of those one pot wonders where you only need a few ingredients but it’s paramount that the ingredients are of the highest standard and flavour. 

Serves 4                                              

800g small potatoes, scrubbed
1 teaspoon sea salt
300g pork and fennel sausages
50ml olive oil
1⁄2 cup white wine or cider
2 tablespoons capers
1⁄2 preserved lemon, flesh removed, finely sliced (optional) or a little fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons finely chopped chives or fennel tops

Method

Place the potatoes on a board then use a rolling pin or some other heavy object to lightly crack them. Sprinkle with the salt and stand for 5 minutes.  If you can’t get hold of small potatoes to do these methods then use the smallest potatoes you can find and cut them into chunks.  You do not have to do the rolling pin thing.  Simply cook them in the same way as mentioned below in the recipe.


Meanwhile, squeeze the sausage meat from its casings and break into bite-sized pieces. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a wide saucepan then add the sausage pieces. Fry until browned and crisp then remove from the saucepan and set aside. Add the remaining oil and the potatoes and fry for a few minutes then return the sausages to the saucepan. Cover and cook for 20 minutes or until the potatoes are tender, shaking the pan occasionally. Add the wine, capers and preserved lemon. Cover and remove from the heat then stand for 5 minutes to allow the flavours to infuse. Sprinkle with the chives or fennel tops before serving.

POACHED QUINCE

Poached quince will last in the fridge for up to a week.  Great for breakfast with cereal or French toast, fantastic braised with pork and can be added to any number of puddings.  I like to place the poached quince in the bottom of a pan with a little syrup and then cover snugly with flaky pastry and bake.  Turn over when cooked and you have almost a quince tart tartin!

quince
7 cups  water
1 cup  sugar
1/2 cup  honey
1 lemon (preferably unsprayed), cut in half
1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
6 large, or 8 medium, quince

Method


Mix the water, sugar, honey, lemon and vanilla bean in a large non-reactive pot and turn it on to medium-to-high heat.

While the liquid is heating, quarter, peel, and remove the cores of the quince. Make sure to removed anything tough or fibrous, being very careful with the knife.
As you peel and prepare the quince quarters, slip each one into the simmering liquid. Once they’re all done, cover the pot with a round of parchment paper with a walnut-sized hole cut in the center and place it on top as this will ensure that they stay submerged or they will discolour.


Simmer the quince (do not boil) for at least an hour, until the quince are cooked through.


Cooking time will vary, depending on the quince. They’re done when they are cooked through, which you can do by piercing one with the tip of a sharp paring knife. It’s not unusual for them to take up to 2 hours, or more.


Serve warm, or at room temperature. To store, pour the quince and their liquid into a storage container and refrigerate for up to one week.

ALISON WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING VENDORS FOR THEIR FANTASTIC PRODUCE

ORGANICLAND MEAT – beef bones and meat


YOUNGS LTD – red cabbage


ROSEDALE ORCHARDS – quince


WAITAKI BACON AND HAM – pork and fennel sausages


JUDGE ROCK WINES – wine


LEVITIO BAKERY – selection of baked goods

POACHED QUINCE

quincePoached quince will last in the fridge for up to a week.  Great for breakfast with cereal or French toast, fantastic braised with pork and can be added to any number of puddings.  I like to place the poached quince in the bottom of a pan with a little syrup and then cover snuggly with flaky pastry and bake.  Turn over when cooked and you have a quince tart tartin!

7 cups  water
1 cup  sugar

1/2 cup  honey
1 lemon (preferably unsprayed), cut in half
1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
6 large, or 8 medium, quince
Method
Mix the water, sugar, honey, lemon and vanilla bean in a large non-reactive pot and turn it on to medium-to-high heat.

While the liquid is heating, quarter, peel, and remove the cores of the quince. Make sure to removed anything tough or fibrous, being very careful with the knife.


As you peel and prepare the quince quarters, slip each one into the simmering liquid. Once they’re all done, cover the pot with a round of parchment paper with a walnut-sized hole cut in the center and place it on top as this will ensure that they stay submerged or they will discolour.

Simmer the quince (do not boil) for at least an hour, until the quince are cooked through.


Cooking time will vary, depending on the quince. They’re done when they are cooked through, which you can do by piercing one with the tip of a sharp paring knife. It’s not unusual for them to take up to 2 hours, or more.

Serve warm, or at room temperature. To store, pour the quince and their liquid into a storage container and refrigerate for up to one week.

WAITAKI’S PORK AND FENNEL SAUSAGES WITH POTATOES

This is one of those one pot wonders where you only need a few ingredients but it’s paramount that the ingredients are of the highest standard and flavour. 

Cracked new potatoes with pork & fennel sausages

Serves 4

800g small potatoes, scrubbed
1 teaspoon sea salt
300g pork and fennel sausages
50ml olive oil
1⁄2 cup white wine or cider
2 tablespoons capers
1⁄2 preserved lemon, flesh removed, finely sliced (optional) or a little fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons finely chopped chives or fennel tops
Method

Place the potatoes on a board then use a rolling pin or some other heavy object to lightly crack them. Sprinkle with the salt and stand for 5 minutes.  If you can’t get hold of small potatoes to do these methods then use the smallest potatoes you can find and cut them into chunks.  You do not have to do the rolling pin thing.  Simply cook them in the same way as mentioned below in the recipe.


Meanwhile, squeeze the sausage meat from its casings and break into bite-sized pieces. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a wide saucepan then add the sausage pieces. Fry until browned and crisp then remove from the saucepan and set aside. Add the remaining oil and the potatoes and fry for a few minutes then return the sausages to the saucepan. Cover and cook for 20 minutes or until the potatoes are tender, shaking the pan occasionally. Add the wine, capers and preserved lemon. Cover and remove from the heat then stand for 5 minutes to allow the flavours to infuse. Sprinkle with the chives or fennel tops before serving.

TURKISH RED CABBAGE SALAD

Serves 4-6

½ red cabbage, sliced thinly
1 Tbsp salt

Dressing


50 ml extra virgin olive oil

½ lemon

Salt and pepper

Yoghurt Sauce


½ cup plain yoghurt

1-2 cloves garlic, minced with pinch of salt

Paprika Oil


2 Tbsp olive oil

Generous pinch paprika and cayenne pepper

Method

Remove the thick white core in the centre of the cabbage and discard.  Slice the remaining cabbage as thin as possible. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of salt and massage into the cabbage, leave for at least 30 minutes to 1 hour.  Rinse under cold water and drain well.

Make the dressing and toss through the cabbage and place into a serving dish.

Mix the yoghurt with the garlic and drizzle on top.

Warm the oil in a small pan or saucepan add the paprika and cayenne pepper and warm through.  Pour over the yoghurt and serve.

HEARTY BEEF AND BARLEY SOUP

This soup is a fantastic way to use up bits and pieces – I am using organic beef bones from Organic Land which give this soup a wonderful, comforting flavour.

Serves 6-8

2-4 beef soup bones (osso bucco or ox tail)
4 stalks celery, diced


1 onion, diced


4 carrots, diced


2 leeks, sliced thinly


½ swede, peeled and diced


1 cup barley


Salt and pepper


4 sprigs fresh thyme


1 bay leaf


Generous handful fresh parsley, chopped

Method

Place the bones in a large pot, cover with cold water and bring to the boil, remove any scum that has risen to the top and reduce the temperature to a gentle simmer.


Add the herbs, onion, light part of the leek and carrots.  Simmer away for 1 ½ hours.  Add the swede, and barley season with salt and pepper and cook for a further 30 minutes or until the barley and swede are tender. Adjust the seasoning you may find you need to add a generous amount to salt.


Remove the bones and pick off any meat and return it to the soup, discard the bones.  Add the chopped parsley and serve.

BRAISED RED CABBAGE WITH CIDER AND HAZELNUTS

Warming flavours of autumn combined with the crunch of freshly harvested nuts is quite simple delicious!

50 ml olive oil


1 onion, thinly sliced


2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced


1 tsp caraway seeds


½ red cabbage (about 700g), thinly sliced


150ml cider


100ml red wine or cider vinegar


100g (1/2 cup firmly packed) brown sugar


100g hazelnuts, lightly roasted

Method

Heat olive oil in a large saucepan. Add onion, garlic and caraway seeds stir occasionally over medium heat until soft (7-10 minutes). Add cabbage and stir occasionally (8-10 minutes). Add cider, vinegar and sugar, stir to combine and cook until liquid has almost evaporated (20-25 minutes), season to taste.  Lightly crush the toasted hazelnuts and scatter over the cabbage.  Serve.

It is great with all meats, duck and game.

OTAGO FARMERS MARKET

hands on teaching – mobile kitchen

Every week i get the pleasure to cook with such unbelievably fresh produce and i also get to talk to the producers and find out how their gardens are growing, animals are rearing and cheese is maturing.  As a chef and a passionate foodie it is the most inspirational recipe to create menus.  Just by walking by the stalls and looking at the vast array of seasonal produce you can’t help but be inspired.
Nuts are back as harvesting has been upon them – i highly recommend trying the walnuts, because if like me and you have had far to many rancid ones (which come in a packet) it can put you off, until you have a fresh one just shelled  which is creamy, a little caramel and not bitter -now that is what a walnut should taste like.
Quince are in and their season is short so it should be celebrated, i still have quince paste (membrillo) in my fridge from last season. In the next couple of weeks i will demonstrate how to prepare them and some tasty little dishes. Pumpkins, corn and marrow are on the menu today along with raspberries and rhubarb which i will be turning upside down into a cake.
See you all soon, have a wonderful day and enjoy all the fabulous ingredients we have to cook with.

RASPBERRY ETON MESS

Butler’s berries have saved us time and effort by cleverly bottling fresh raspberries, macerated in sugar syrup and sealed in a jar.  I thought this is not only great over ice cream but delicious folded through this glorious pudding known as Eton Mess.

Serves 4

2-3 cups fresh raspberries or strawberries or 1 jar of macerated berries and 1 -2 cups fresh berries
2 tsp caster or vanilla sugar
2 cups cream
4-6 meringues
Method

If using the fresh berries which are already in syrup then you won’t need to add anything to your berries, however if using only fresh, you will need to cut the strawberries into chunks, sprinkle with a couple teaspoons sugar and a little fresh orange or pomegranate juice to add a little moisture. Whip the cream in a large bowl until thick but still soft. Roughly crumble in 4 of the meringues nests – you will need chunks for texture as well as a little fine dust.


Take out about half a cupful of the chopped berries, and fold the meringue cream and rest of the fruit mixture together.


Arrange on 4 serving plates or glasses or in a mound, and top each with some of the remaining macerated berries and any juice.

FRESH CORN, MARROW AND BARLEY SALAD

Serves 4-6

200g barley


400g marrow, peeled, seeds removed


2 cobs of fresh corn, kernels removed


1 red onion, cut into wedges


1 red chilli seeds removed and finely chopped (i used cherry-chillI)


generous handful wild rocket or any robust leaf


Generous handful flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped


1 tsp sumac


Sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper


Extra virgin olive oil

Sherry or red wine vinegar

Method

To make the dressing; 2 Tbsp sherry vinegar. 5 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, sea salt and pepper. Stir to combine. Set aside

Cook the barley in lightly salted water until tender (15 minutes). Drain, drizzle over a little dressing, cool. Set aside.
Heat up a fry pan with a little olive oil, and add the marrow, cook until golden in colour, add the onion and corn, cook gently for 5 minutes.
Add to the barley and mix through, add the herbs, chilli and rocket, sprinkle over the sumac and add a little more dressing. Mix gently together and taste, adjust seasoning as needed.

SPICED PUMPKIN SOUP

This is yet another great recipe for the humble pumpkin. This recipe has a little spice to liven up the cold nights

Serves 4

1 Tbsp vegetable oil


1 Tbsp butter


1 clove garlic, chopped


4 shallots, or 1 small onion, chopped


2 small fresh red chili peppers, chopped


1 tablespoon chopped lemon grass


1.5 litres cups chicken or veg stock


4 cups peeled and diced pumpkin


1 ½  cups unsweetened coconut milk


1 handful fresh basil leaves, roughly torn


1 handful fresh coriander (stalks and all) roughly chopped


Fish sauce – a couple of splashes


Pinch of salt and crack of pepper

Method


In a medium saucepan, heat oil and butter over low heat. Cook shallots, chilli, and lemongrass in oil until fragrant (be careful not to burn the garlic), add the pumpkin and garlic and cook for a further 5 minutes. Stir in chicken stock and coconut milk; bring to a boil. Cook until pumpkin is tender.


Add the basil and coriander and blend the soup in batches to either a smooth or slightly chunky consistency, whichever you prefer.


Serve.

UPSIDE-DOWN RHUBARB CAKE


Rhubarb is back and this cake is not only magical in taste but also in appearance.

Serves 8

300g butter


200g soft brown sugar


350g rhubarb, trimmed and cut into 2cm pieces


200g plain flour


1 tsp baking powder


¼ tsp baking soda


½ tsp salt


200ml buttermilk


2 medium eggs


80mls vegetable oil


2 Tbsp finely chopped crystallised ginger

Method


Preheat oven to 170C

Melt the butter in a 24cm ovenproof frypan over a medium heat.  Stir in half the soft sugar and cook for about 5 minutes or until the sugar has dissolved and a caramel has formed.  Remove from the heat.


Add the rhubarb neatly starting from the centre and working outwards in a spiral shape, ensuring that the rhubarb is standing upright and is placed close together.  Set aside whilst you make the topping.


Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt.


Whisk the remaining sugar with the buttermilk, eggs, oil and ginger.  Add the flour mixture and mix well.  Pour over the rhubarb and smooth the surface.


Bake for 30 minutes or until the cake springs back when pressed in the centre.


Cool on a rack for 10 minutes then run a knife carefully around the edge to release the cake then invert on to a serving plate.  Serve warm with cream or ice cream.

Alison would like to thank the following vendors for their incredible produce

ROSEDALE ORCHARDS – pumpkin and corn


McARTHURS BERRIES – rhubarb


TE MAHENO – marrow


BUTLERS BERRIES – raspberries


jUDGE ROCK WINES – wine


LEVITIO BAKEERY – selection of bread


 

SPICED PUMPKIN SOUP

This is yet another great recipe for the humble pumpkin. This recipe has a little spice to liven up the cold nights

Serves 4


1 Tbsp vegetable oil


1 Tbsp butter


1 clove garlic, chopped


4 shallots, or 1 small onion, chopped


2 small fresh red chili peppers, chopped


1 tablespoon chopped lemon grass


1.5 litres cups chicken or veg stock


4 cups peeled and diced pumpkin


1 ½  cups unsweetened coconut milk


1 handful fresh basil leaves, roughly torn


1 handful fresh coriander (stalks and all) roughly chopped


Fish sauce – a couple of splashes


Pinch of salt and crack of pepper

Method

In a medium saucepan, heat oil and butter over low heat. Cook shallots, chilli, and lemongrass in oil until fragrant (be careful not to burn the garlic), add the pumpkin and garlic and cook for a further 5 minutes. Stir in chicken stock and coconut milk; bring to a boil. Cook until pumpkin is tender.


Add the basil and coriander and blend the soup in batches to either a smooth or slightly chunky consistency, whichever you prefer.

Serve.

FRESH CORN, MARROW AND BARLEY SALAD

Serves 4-6

200g barley


400g marrow, peeled, seeds removed


2 cobs of fresh corn, kernels removed


1 red onion, cut into wedges


1 red chilli seeds removed and finely chopped (i used cherry-chillI)


Generous handful wild rocket or any robust leaf


Generous handful flat leaf parsley, roughly chopped


1 tsp sumac


Sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper


Extra virgin olive oil

Sherry or red wine vinegar

Method
To make the dressing; 2 Tbsp sherry vinegar. 5 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil, sea salt and pepper. Stir to combine. Set aside

Cook the barley in lightly salted water until tender (15 minutes). Drain, drizzle over a little dressing, cool. Set aside.
Heat up a fry pan with a little olive oil, and add the marrowcook until golden in colour, add the onion and corn, cook gently for 5 minutes.
Add to the barley and mix through, add the herbs, chilli and rocket, sprinkle over the sumac and add a little more dressing. Mix gently together and taste, adjust seasoning as needed.

RASPBERRY ETON MESS

Butler’s berries have saved us time and effort by cleverly bottling fresh raspberries, macerated in sugar syrup and sealed in a jar.  I thought this is not only great over ice cream but delicious folded through this glorious pudding known as Eton Mess.

Serves 4


2-3 cups fresh raspberries or strawberries or 1 jar of macerated berries and 1 -2 cups fresh


2 tsp caster or vanilla sugar


2 cups cream

4-6 meringues

Method


If using the fresh berries which are already in syrup then you won’t need to add anything to your berries, however if using only fresh, you will need to cut the strawberries into chunks, sprinkle with a couple teaspoons sugar and a little fresh orange or pomegranate juice to add a little moisture. Whip the cream in a large bowl until thick but still soft. Roughly crumble in 4 of the meringues nests – you will need chunks for texture as well as a little fine dust.


Take out about half a cupful of the chopped berries, and fold the meringue cream and rest of the fruit mixture together.

Arrange on 4 serving plates or glasses or in a mound, and top each with some of the remaining macerated berries and any juice.