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LOCAL FOOD HERO – JIM BYARS (the friday shop)

I was sieving through some of my posts for Insiders Dunedin www.insidersdunedin.co.nz  and came across the one I did recently on Jim Byars and his ‘Friday Shop and thought it was so magical that I wanted to share this once again.

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Carl and Jim

This man with his endless passion and knowledge for the ‘craft” left me inspired and Dunedin has a lot to be thankful for .

LOCAL FOOD HERO – JIM BYARS

Every Friday in Roslyn you will notice cars waiting bumper to bumper, people bustling to and fro carrying bags, looking excited with anticipation.  And you wonder what is going on, where have all these people been? Then you get a glimpse through the window and you notice more people all eagerly buying croissants, tarts, pre made meals and then it dwells on you that this is the place where that chef has worked with Albert Roux at Le Gavroche Restaurant! This has got to be one of the best kept secrets of Dunedin.  Well no more I have to spread the word as this place is of world class standard and the owner and Chef Jim Byars deserves all the respect this town can give him and I am honoured to be able to have him for this weeks ‘Local Food Hero’.

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 LOCAL FOOD HERO – HIGHGATE BRIDGE BAKERY (THE FRIDAY SHOP)

JIM BYARS

300 Highgate Roslyn

Dunedin 9010

+64 3-474 9222  

There are not too many chefs that I meet that almost bring me to tears with respect.  When you watch a master at work with such skill, knowledge and passion you can’t help but be impressed.  Whilst I was talking to Jim in his kitchen he was rolling and folding his pure butter dough which will be used for his croissants, tarts and pies. I was also inhaling this comforting aroma and noticed his large pot of simmering stock which is used to encase his stews and pies.  He proudly promotes that he has no need to for additives or powders as everything he make is from start to finish and done properly.

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Jim started making and selling his goods some 17 years ago from the boot of a car, word got around fast and now his shop in Roslyn opens at 7.30am every Friday and closes when it’s all gone.  He does indeed only open one day a week but on the other days he is preparing all that he sells.  When you make your own puff pastry from scratch, terrines, confit of duck, navarin of lamb, dauphonise potatoes, pies, quiches, beef encroute and let us not forget the light and crispy croissants, pain au chocolate, almond croissants and sublime tarts you need all the time you can get.

I am sure I am speaking for all of Dunedin when I say thank you to Jim and his young chef Carl for never letting go of the ‘Craft’ and giving us something to look forward to every Friday.  Thank you!

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otago farmers market – menu mobile kitchen

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Saturday is upon us again and time to do retail food-therapy! Where to begin and what do I feel like cooking? Do I opt for long slow comforting meals or do I feel like putting together a warm, wholesome roasted vegetable salad with a wicked dressing or maybe something light and pleasing like fresh or smoked fish…..It is a challenge I know deciding and planning your meals, but if like me and you just get inspired and creative with walking around the market.  Today I will have a large pot or bacon and chickpea soup, filled to the brim with seasonal veg.  Marrow is well and truly here and for a few dollars it is astounding just what you can make.  Brydone Organics outstanding potatoes with be mashed and served with cabbage, very Irish in origin and perfect for the colder nights.

Looking forward to cooking some great dishes, sipping some soup, talking food and catching up.  See you all soon at the mobile kitchen.

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Rosedale Orchards – pumpkins!

 

BAKED QUNICE

Every year I celebrate the mighty quince as they have such uniqueness not only with their flavour and aroma but also with their versatility.

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Serves 1-2

1 quince, halved and core removed

10g butter

30g brown sugar

1 star anise

Grating fresh nutmeg

Fresh bayleaf

½ cup water

Method

Preheat the oven to 180C

When preparing quince you need to work quickly as they discolour almost instantly.  Place the quince halves flesh side up in a snug oven dish.  Squash the butter into the core cavity and sprinkle over the brown sugar, add the star anise and bayleaf to the oven dish and add the water.  Finish with a generous grating of nutmeg and place into the oven.

Bake for 20 minutes and then check by carefully inserting a skewer into the flesh if its tender all the way through then it is cooked if not then continue cooking for another 10-20 minutes or until tender.  If you notice that the liquid has reduced to much add a little more water so that it doesn’t burn.  You may also need to cover it with foil.

When they are tender and aromatic and the sauce has turned into a golden glaze serve warm with pouring cream or good quality vanilla icecream.  They also go particularly well with pork and duck!

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MARROW CHUTNEY

Makes 2kg

1.35kg marrow, peeled, seeded and cubed

salt

2 apples, peeled, cored and chopped

3 shallots, chopped

225g sultanas

1 garlic clove, finely chopped

450g dark brown soft sugar

375ml vinegar

1 ½ Tbsp grated ginger

1 Tbsp Dijon mustard

¼ tsp crushed chillies (less if desired)

Method

Place the sliced marrow into a non-reactive bowl and sprinkle generously with salt. Cover and let sit overnight.

Drain marrow, rinse thoroughly and place into a large pot. Add remaining ingredients and slowly bring to the boil.

Lower the heat and gently simmer for 1 ½ to 2 hours or until thick, stirring occasionally.

Pour into hot sterilised jars and seal immediately.

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BACON AND PORK BONE SOUP

This is more like a meal in a bowl than a soup.  Any bones, or off cuts of meat work well as do chorizo sausages.

Serves 8

1 Bacon hock

2 Pork hock

300g dried chickpeas, soaked overnight, then drained

4 potatoes

400g turnips or swede, cut into large wedges

400g carrots, halved lenthways

600g cabbage, cut into thick wedges

Extra virgin olive oil to serve

Salt and cracked pepper

Method

Put the water in a large saucepan and add the bones.  Bring to the boil, skimming off any impurities that rise to the surface.  Add the chickpeas.  Reduce the heat, partly cover the pan, and simmer for 1 ½ hours.

Add the potatoes, turnips/swede, carrots and simmer, partly covered for 30 minutes. Remove the bones from the soup and flake off the meat and discard the bones. Place the cabbage in the stock and poach the cabbage for 5 minutes or until just tender, return the meat back to the soup and warm through. Adjust seasoning.

Serve in large deep bowls with a drizzle of olive oil and a crack of pepper.

 

GRAPE JELLY

Makes 4 250ml jars

1.8 kg ripe grapes, stemmed (10 cups)

1 Granny Smith apple, chopped, with seeds

2 ¼ cups sugar

Method

Put the grapes and apple in a large pot and add 1/2 cup of water. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer over low heat until very juicy, about 10 minutes. Strain the juice through a fine sieve set over a large bowl.

Strain the juice again through several layers of dampened cheesecloth, without pressing or squeezing; you should have 3 cups – I usually do this overnight.

In a very large saucepan, boil the grape juice and sugar over moderate heat, stirring, until the jelly thickens.  I place a small spoonful of jelly onto a cold saucer and place somewhere to cool.  If it stays apart when you run your finger through it then it is ready or if you have an instant-read thermometer and it registers 220° about 18 minutes.

Pour the jelly into hot, sterilized jars to within 1 cm of the rims. Seal. Submerge the jars in a pot of water and boil for 5 minutes. Carefully remove the jars and let cool. Check the jar lids to make sure they’ve fully sealed; refrigerate any jars with imperfect seals.

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MASHED POTATO AND CABBAGE

Comforting, satisfying and versatile. This is perfectly fine on its own or works beautiful teamed up with beef, lamb, pork or fish.

Serves 4-6 as a generous side

900g potatoes, peeled and cut into large chunks

450ml chicken or veg stock

450g leeks, trimmed and thinly sliced

225ml milk

3 garlic cloves, crushed

1 bay leaf

1 green cabbage, about 450g , cored and thinly sliced

4 Tbsp cold water

¼ tsp  grated nutmeg

¼  tsp salt

¼ tsp white pepper

25g  butter

Method

Place the potatoes, stock and enough water to cover in a large saucepan. Bring to the boil and cook for about 20 minutes or until tender.

Meanwhile, combine the leeks, milk, garlic and bay leaf in another large saucepan. Cover and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 15–20 minutes or until the leeks are softened. Drain, reserving the leeks, milk and garlic separately. Discard the bay leaf.

Place the cabbage into a suitable size pot, add 1cup of water and cook for 10–15 minutes or until tender, then drain. Squeeze dry and chop finely.

Drain the potatoes and transfer to a large bowl. Add the milk and garlic, and mash until smooth Stir in the leeks, cabbage, nutmeg, salt, pepper and butter.

Serve.

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Steve McArthur – McArthur Berry Farm

Alison would like to thank the following vendors for their fantastic produce

TE MAHANGA – quince and marrows

HAVOC – bacon and pork hocks

SUNRISE BAKERY – fresh baked goods

JUDGE ROCK WINES – pinot grapes

BRYDONE ORGANICS – potatoes and cabbage

BAKED QUNICE

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Every year I celebrate the mighty quince as they have such uniqueness not only with their flavour and aroma but also with their versatility.

Serves 1-2

1 quince, halved and core removed

10g butter

30g brown sugar

1 star anise

Grating fresh nutmeg

Fresh bayleaf

½ cup water

Method

Preheat the oven to 180C

When preparing quince you need to work quickly as they discolour almost instantly.  Place the quince halves flesh side up in a snug oven dish.  Squash the butter into the core cavity and sprinkle over the brown sugar, add the star anise and bayleaf to the oven dish and add the water.  Finish with a generous grating of nutmeg and place into the oven.

Bake for 20 minutes and then check by carefully inserting a skewer into the flesh if its tender all the way through then it is cooked if not then continue cooking for another 10-20 minutes or until tender.  If you notice that the liquid has reduced to much add a little more water so that it doesn’t burn.  You may also need to cover it with foil.

When they are tender and aromatic and the sauce has turned into a golden glaze serve warm with pouring cream or good quality vanilla icecream.  They also go particularly well with pork and duck!

 

 

ROASTED GRAPES!

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This I know may sound a little crazy roasting grapes, but it works surprisingly well.  Harwarden Organics have wine grapes of different varieties such as pinot noir, muscat and Gewurztraminer which are fantastic and when roasted the sugars seem to intensify and make these little morsels explode with flavour.

Roasted Grapes Pre-heat the oven to 200C

Take a small cluster of red, seedless grapes and gently toss it in a bowl with 1 tsp. of extra virgin olive oil, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Place cluster on a baking tray and roast for 8-10 minutes. The grapes will puff-up, darken in spots, and begin to blister. Serve with a good cheese, fresh bread or simply on their own.

Enjoy them while they’re still warm!

Otago Farmers Market – 10 birthday

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We are celebrating today as the Otago Farmers Market is officially 10 years old!  I would like to thank the Farmers Market Trust and all the great people behind the scenes who make our market so wonderful. 

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I would also like to thank all the outstanding producers who work so hard to provide us with endless inspiration and ingredients week after week and of course I would like to thank you all for supporting the market and appreciating fantastic ingredients.

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ONION TART

Autumn is here

Autumn is here

This is the perfect tart for autumn, with its sweet-smoky flavours and comforting pastry it makes for a very satisfying lunch or simple supper with a good salad.

Serves 6

For the pastry

250g flour

175g butter, cold and cut into small pieces

2 egg yolks, lightly beaten

Beans for baking blind

For the filling

50g butter

2 Tbsp olive oil

400g onions, finely sliced (a mandolin works well)

120ml cream

2 eggs

¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg

Sea salt

Freshly ground pepper

Method

To make the pastry, put the flour in a bowl, add the butter and rub together with your fingertips until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.  Using a bread and butter knife in a cutting motion, combine the egg yolks with the mix until the pastry comes together, if it is a little crumbly add one teaspoon of cold water at a time until you get a firm, yet moist dough.   Turn out onto a lightly floured bench and quickly knead until the pastry is even and smooth, then wrap and place in the fridge to chill for at least 30 minutes.

While the pastry is resting make the filling.  Melt the butter with the oil in a large-heavy based pot or fry pan.  Add the finely sliced onion and cook over a low heat for 30 minutes.  Cooking the onions long and slow is essential as the natural sweetness comes out of them and the texture becomes soft and they almost melt together. Cool slightly.

Heat the oven to 200C

Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured surface and line a 30cm push up bottom flan tin or something similar, making sure there are no cracks.  Return to the fridge and rest for another 30 minutes, then line with baking paper and fill with baking beans.  Bake for 20 minutes, reduce the heat to 160C and cook for a further 15 minutes, or until the pastry is golden and set.

FANTASTIC FISH KEBABS WITH GRILLED CHILLI DRESSING

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This dish can be eaten with or without the chilli dressing but if you are feeling a little daring then I highly recommend it as it will make these kebabs taste out of this world.

Serves 6-8

500 g monkfish tail, trimmed of all skin and bone and cut into 2.5cm cubes

6-8 skewers or sticks fresh rosemary, lower leaves removed, tips kept on

255 g waxy potatoes, boiled lightly and cut into bite sized pieces

2 bulbs fennel, cut into 4mm wedges

For the marinade

2 thumb-sized pieces fresh ginger, thinly sliced

juice and zest of 1 lemon

1 teaspoon turmeric

2 cloves garlic

2 dried chillies, crumbled

1 handful fresh mint

4 tablespoons natural yoghurt

Method

Put all the marinade ingredients except the yoghurt into a food processor and blitz until smooth. Stir in the yoghurt. Using the skewers or rosemary sticks, skewer the fish alternately with the new potatoes and fennel. Drizzle with the marinade and grill for 2 minutes each side.

GRILLED CHIILI DRESSING

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Chillies – Kakanui Produce

Serves 6

3 fresh red chillies

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

3½ Tbsp fresh lemon juice

1 small bunch fresh mint, leaves picked and finely chopped

sea salt

freshly ground black pepper

Method

Prick the chillies with the tip of a sharp knife – this stops them popping or exploding when they are cooked. The best way to blacken the chillies is to hold them with a metal pair of tongs directly into a gas flame obviously if that isn’t possible pop them uder a hot grill. You want the skin to blacken and blister all over.  Place the chillies in a small bowl, cover with cling film and leave for 15 minutes. This way they will steam in their own heat and the skins will peel off very easily.
First this stage I would recommend using gloves at this stage to peel the chillies, open them up and scrape out all the white seeds. Discard these, then finely chop the flesh of the chillies. Put in a mixing bowl, add the oil, lemon juice and mint, and mix well. Season to taste and serve.

You can omit the mint and add coriander or flat leaf parsley if desired.

SIMPLY COOKED SILVER BEET WITH GARLIC

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silver beet

Serves 4

1 bunch of silver beet

3 cloves garlic, sliced thinly

Pinch chilli flakes (optional)

Salt and freshly ground pepper

Olive oil

Method

Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil.

Separate the green leaves from the stalk of the silver beet by either running a knife along outline of stalk or hold the stalk close to the green and slide your hand down the stalk and it should pull the leaves off easily. Put the stalks in one pile and the leaves in another as they take different times to cook.

When the water has come to the boil add the stalks and cook for a couple of minutes before adding the leaves.  Continue to cook for a further 2 minutes or until tender.

Whilst the silver beet is cooking place a clean tea towel onto a tray and set aside.  Once the silver beet is cooked carefully drain and place the stalks and leaves flat onto tray to cool and drain.  This may seem an odd way to do this them but it works brilliantly.

Heat a large fry pan over a medium heat and add a couple of generous glugs of olive oil, add the garlic slivers and allow these to turn a light golden colour and you will notice a wonderful nutty smells, add a pinch of chilli flakes if using and add the silver beet and cook quickly so that everything is nicely coated in the fragrant oil and the sliver beet has got a lovely saute look. Serve immediately!

 

 QUINCE MARMALADE

fresh quince

fresh quince

Quince are inedibly tannic in their raw state. When they are cooked, the same chemicals that cause this astringency on our tongues break down and bond with oxygen chemicals to form anthocyanins, the plant pigments that cause fruit and vegetable to appear red.

Make 500ml

4 cups chopped cored peeled quince (about 4 quinces)

3 cups water

2 cups sugar

¼ cup 3mm thick julienne(sliced)-cut lemon rind

¼ cup fresh lemon juice

Method

Combine all ingredients in a large heavy based saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium, and cook 1 hour and 15 minutes or until thick. (Mixture will continue to thicken as it cools.) Stir frequently and watch closely for catching on the bottom!

When thick and set pour carefully into sterilsed jars and seal or store in fridge.

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Hand carved wooden spoons made from native, recycled floor boards from Dunedin. Available from mobile kitchen!

 Alison would like to thank the following

WAITAKI BACON AND HAM – selection of bacon and pork products

BRYDONE ORGANICS – onions

JANEFIELD HYDROPONICS  – rocket

EDMONDS FRESH FISH – scallops

WAIRUNA ORGANICS – beetroot

ROSEDALE ORCHARDS – quince and corn

THE BOAT SHED – smoked fish and salmon pate

WHITESTONE CHEESE – selection of cheese

HARBOUR FISH – monkfish

GILBERTS FINE FOOD/LIEVITO BAKERY – freshly baked bread

KAKANUI PRODUCE – chiilies

KUTASH ORGANICS – onions and garlic

JUDGE ROCK WINES – central otago wines

AFIFE – hummus

MCARTHURS BERRY FARM – silverbeet

 

 

GRILLED CHIILI DRESSING

 

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Cherry Chilli

Serves 6

3 fresh red chillies

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

3½ Tbsp fresh lemon juice

1 small bunch fresh mint, leaves picked and finely chopped

sea salt

freshly ground black pepper

Method

Prick the chillies with the tip of a sharp knife – this stops them popping or exploding when they are cooked. The best way to blacken the chillies is to hold them with a metal pair of tongs directly into a gas flame obviously if that isn’t possible pop them uder a hot grill. You want the skin to blacken and blister all over.  Place the chillies in a small bowl, cover with cling film and leave for 15 minutes. This way they will steam in their own heat and the skins will peel off very easily.
First this stage I would recommend using gloves at this stage to peel the chillies, open them up and scrape out all the white seeds. Discard these, then finely chop the flesh of the chillies. Put in a mixing bowl, add the oil, lemon juice and mint, and mix well. Season to taste and serve.

You can omit the mint and add coriander or flat leaf parsley if desired.

FANTASTIC FISH KEBABS WITH GRILLED CHILLI DRESSING

IMG_0569 (513x640)

This dish can be eaten with or without the chilli dressing but if you are feeling a little daring then I highly recommend it as it will make these kebabs taste out of this world.

Serves 6-8

500 g monkfish tail, trimmed of all skin and bone and cut into 2.5cm cubes

6-8 skewers or sticks fresh rosemary, lower leaves removed, tips kept on

255 g waxy potatoes, boiled lightly and cut into bite sized pieces

2 bulbs fennel, cut into 4mm wedges

For the marinade

2 thumb-sized pieces fresh ginger, thinly sliced

juice and zest of 1 lemon

1 teaspoon turmeric

2 cloves garlic

2 dried chillies, crumbled

1 handful fresh mint

4 tablespoons natural yoghurt

Method

Put all the marinade ingredients except the yoghurt into a food processor and blitz until smooth. Stir in the yoghurt. Using the skewers or rosemary sticks, skewer the fish alternately with the new potatoes and fennel. Drizzle with the marinade and grill for 2 minutes each side.

GRILLED CHIILI DRESSING

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Serves 6

3 fresh red chillies

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

3½ Tbsp fresh lemon juice

1 small bunch fresh mint, leaves picked and finely chopped

sea salt

freshly ground black pepper

Method

Prick the chillies with the tip of a sharp knife – this stops them popping or exploding when they are cooked. The best way to blacken the chillies is to hold them with a metal pair of tongs directly into a gas flame obviously if that isn’t possible pop them uder a hot grill. You want the skin to blacken and blister all over.  Place the chillies in a small bowl, cover with cling film and leave for 15 minutes. This way they will steam in their own heat and the skins will peel off very easily.
First this stage I would recommend using gloves at this stage to peel the chillies, open them up and scrape out all the white seeds. Discard these, then finely chop the flesh of the chillies. Put in a mixing bowl, add the oil, lemon juice and mint, and mix well. Season to taste and serve.

You can omit the mint and add coriander or flat leaf parsley if desired

SIMPLY COOKED SILVER BEET WITH GARLIC

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I learnt this method to cook my silver beet or swiss chard, (depending on where you come from) whilst working at the River Café and it was a revelation.  It took this winter staple to another level, who would of thought with a few simple techniques and a sliver or two of garlic that this would bring silver beet back to life!

Serves 4

1 bunch of silver beet

3 cloves garlic, sliced thinly

Pinch chilli flakes (optional)

Salt and freshly ground pepper

Olive oil

Method

Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil.

Separate the green leaves from the stalk of the silver beet by either running a knife along outline of stalk or hold the stalk close to the green and slide your hand down the stalk and it should pull the leaves off easily. Put the stalks in one pile and the leaves in another as they take different times to cook.

When the water has come to the boil add the stalks and cook for a couple of minutes before adding the leaves.  Continue to cook for a further 2 minutes or until tender.

Whilst the silver beet is cooking place a clean tea towel onto a tray and set aside.  Once the silver beet is cooked carefully drain and place the stalks and leaves flat onto tray to cool and drain.  This may seem an odd way to do this them but it works brilliantly.

Heat a large fry pan over a medium heat and add a couple of generous glugs of olive oil, add the garlic slivers and allow these to turn a light golden colour and you will notice a wonderful nutty smells, add a pinch of chilli flakes if using and add the silver beet and cook quickly so that everything is nicely coated in the fragrant oil and the sliver beet has got a lovely saute look. Serve immediately!

 

 

QUINCE MARMALADE

Quince are in season and it is a short season so with a little effort and a little time you can make any number of delicious jams, jellies, pastes and chutney’s.  Be careful preparing them as they are hard and allow plenty of time for cooking as they can take up to an hour or more. 

fresh quince

fresh quince

(Quince are inedibly tannic in their raw state. When they are cooked, the same chemicals that cause this astringency on our tongues break down and bond with oxygen chemicals to form anthocyanins, the plant pigments that cause fruit and vegetable to appear red).

Make 500ml

4 cups chopped cored peeled quince (about 4 quinces)

3 cups water

2 cups sugar

¼ cup 3mm thick julienne(sliced)-cut lemon rind

¼ cup fresh lemon juice

Method

Combine all ingredients in a large heavy based saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium, and cook 1 hour and 15 minutes or until thick. (Mixture will continue to thicken as it cools.) Stir frequently and watch closely for catching on the bottom!

When thick and set pour carefully into sterilsed jars and seal or store in fridge

ONION TART

onion tart (640x380)

This is the perfect tart for autumn, with its sweet-smoky flavours and comforting pastry it makes for the perfect lunch or simple supper with a good salad.

Serves 6

For the pastry

250g flour

175g butter, cold and cut into small pieces

2 egg yolks, lightly beaten

Beans for baking blind

For the filling

50g butter

2 Tbsp olive oil

400g onions, finely sliced (a mandolin works well)

120ml cream

2 eggs

¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg

Sea salt

Freshly ground pepper

Method

To make the pastry, put the flour in a bowl, add the butter and rub together with your fingertips until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.  Using a bread and butter knife in a cutting motion, combine the egg yolks with the mix until the pastry comes together, if it is a little crumbly add one teaspoon of cold water at a time until you get a firm, yet moist dough.   Turn out onto a lightly floured bench and quickly knead until the pastry is even and smooth, then wrap and place in the fridge to chill for at least 30 minutes.

While the pastry is resting make the filling.  Melt the butter with the oil in a large-heavy based pot or fry pan.  Add the finely sliced onion and cook over a low heat for 30 minutes.  Cooking the onions long and slow is essential as the natural sweetness comes out of them and the texture becomes soft and they almost melt together. Cool slightly.

Heat the oven to 200C

Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured surface and line a 30cm push up bottom flan tin or something similar, making sure there are no cracks.  Return to the fridge and rest for another 30 minutes, then line with baking paper and fill with baking beans.  Bake for 20 minutes, reduce the heat to 160C and cook for a further 15 minutes, or until the pastry is golden and set.

Add the onion mixture and spread evenly over base.  Carefully pour over the egg mix and grate heavily with nutmeg.

Bake for 20-30 minutes or until the edges are set but the centres is still slightly wobbly>

Cool slightly and cut into desired portions and enjoy either on its own or with a crisp green salad,