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otago farmers market – mobile kitchen menu 25/05/2013

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What a week we have had with the weather it sure threw me into turmoil.  It was so cold I think I ate myself through the snow day and are now thinking its time to eat soup and salads to get back on track.  However I am in the mood for sampling some of Origins Meats tasty beef, I often cook steak from the mobile kitchen as it is one of the most enquired techniques as so many people have trouble.  Hopefully I can help clarify this and we get to eat some juicy steak!

Yams are plump and delicious and this week I am making a South American inspired salad which is a fantastic way to use our humble yam and turn it into something a little different.  And no menu would be complete without a Brussels sprout recipe so this time I am adding a hint of cheese to lift these crunchy little morsels and they will surprise you especially all those sceptics out there!

And yes I have thought of pudding as no market day would be complete without a little something sweet and this cake is not only sublime to eat it is simple to prepare.  Have a great day and do come by and have a sample!

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HOW TO COOK A GREAT STEAK

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ORIGIN MEATS
Stewart and Michelle Kelly

What better way than to taste beef than by eating a great steak! Today we are sampling our new vendor Origin Meats who are from Tairei Mouth, make sure you talk to them as they have different varieties of beef which all have different degrees of fat, age and flavour. 

When selecting your meat, have a look at the colour, you don’t want bright red, it needs to be aged. Fine marbling is an indicator of flavour, and lean meat should be tender. The cut depends on yourself – thick / thin – lean/ fatty…
Varieties – Fillet
– Rib-eye (scotch fillet)
– Sirloin
– Rump/porterhouse
– T-bone

Method
Have steaks out of fridge for at least ½ an hour before cooking. Season well with cracked black pepper and only season with salt just before you cook it as it will draw out the moisture from the meat. A little drizzle of oil and do the same to the other side.
Heat up a good heavy base fry pan or griddle pan until almost smoking. You need it super-hot as you want the meat to sear instantly.
Once your pan is HOT carefully add the steak. If you are cooking for the family try not to over crowd the pan. If necessary use two pans! Try not to prod and prick the steak, leave it so is sears and caramelises – depending on how well you like your steak. You only need to cook an average steak for 3-4 minutes on both sides. The next vital step is to let the meat rest, simply remove the meat from the pan and transfer on to a warm plate and cover with foil. Quickly return the pan back to the heat and add a glug of red wine, beef stock or even water, swirl around pan so all the delicious little caramelised pieces of flavour are removed from the bottom and get incorporated into you sauce. Once the liquid has bubbled and reduced remove from heat and add a couple of knobs of cold butter, swirl round to emulsify into your sauce, you may need salt and pepper. Simply drizzle your sauce over the steak and enjoy every mouthful….!

WARM YAM SALAD

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SERVES 4

1 kg yams, washed and cut into thirds
2-3 jalapeno chillies, seeds and membrane removed (wear rubber gloves) or any green chillies
2 cups fresh coriander, roughly chopped
2 shallots, roughly chopped
2 Tbsp cider vinegar
6 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
A few splashes of Thai fish sauce
Salt and pepper to taste

Method
In a large saucepan, add enough water to just cover the yams add a generous pinch of salt and bring to the boil, reduce to a simmer and cook until tender (10 minutes). Be careful not to overcook them or they will break up. When the yams are done, drain them and spread out over a tray to cool down quickly.

While the yams are cooking pulse the jalapenos, coriander, shallots and garlic cloves, add the vinegar and oil. Taste and add a few drops Thai fish sauce, and freshly ground pepper, taste once again and correct if necessary.

Put the yams into a bowl and pour over chilli mixture, toss gently and serve.

 

APPLE CAKE

apple cake (640x446)

This is an utterly scrumptious cake as it is overloaded with juicy apples, topped with a light batter and baked until golden – need I say more!

Serves 8-10

Butter or nonstick spray, for greasing pan
6-7 large, tart apples, such as Granny Smiths
3 large eggs
200 g sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
125 g white flour
Ground cinnamon and icing sugar, also to finish

Method

Preheat oven to 180C.

Line the bottom of a 20 cm springform pan with greaseproof paper. Butter the paper and the sides of the pan. Peel, halve and core your apples, then chop them into medium-sized chunks (about 2cm squared). Pile the cut apples directly in the prepared pan.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl, using an electric mixer or whisk, beat eggs with sugar until thick and ribbons form on the surface of the beaten eggs. Beat in vanilla, then stir in flour with a spoon until just combined. The batter will be very thick.

Pour over apples in pan, using a spoon or spatula to spread the batter so that it covers all exposed apples.

Bake in preheated oven for 55 to 60 minutes, or until a tester comes out free of batter. Cool in pan for 10 minutes on rack, then flip out onto another rack, peel off the parchment paper, and flip it back onto a serving platter. Dust lightly with ground cinnamon and icing sugar.

Serve warm or cooled. It goes particularly well with freshly whipped cream.

 

CRUNCHY BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH CHEESE

 

brussels sprouts recipe

This is yet another delicious way to eat Brussels sprouts why not try them with a little cheese?

Serves 4-6

24 small brussels sprouts

Knob of butter

1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for rubbing

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1/4 cup grated cheese of your choice (parmesan or aged cheddar works well)

Method

Wash the brussels sprouts well. Trim the stem ends and remove any raggy outer leaves. Cut in half from stem to top and gently rub each half with olive oil, keeping it intact (or if you are lazy just toss them in a bowl with a glug of olive oil).

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in your largest skillet over medium heat. Don’t overheat the fry pan, or the outsides of the brussels sprouts will cook too quickly. Place the brussels sprouts in the pan flat side down (single-layer), sprinkle with a couple pinches of salt, cover, and cook for roughly 5 minutes; the bottoms of the sprouts should only show a hint of browning. Once just tender, uncover, turn up the heat, and cook until the flat sides are deep brown and caramelised. Toss them once or twice to get some browning on the rounded side. Season with more salt, a few grinds of pepper, and a dusting of grated cheese. I suggest eating them straight away!

 

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Alison would like to thank the following vendors for their fantastic produce

ORGIN BEEF – selection of beef products

GODDARDS – yams

ROSEDALE ORCHARDS – pears

MCARTHURS BERRY FARM – Brussels sprouts

GILBERTS FINE FOODS/LIEVITO BAKERY – fresh baked goods

WHITESTONE CHEESE – selection cheese

 

 

 

 

 

 

WARM YAM SALAD

IMG_9240 (640x348)

SERVES 4

1 kg yams, washed and cut into thirds
2-3 jalapeno chillies, seeds and membrane removed (wear rubber gloves) or any green chillies
2 cups fresh coriander, roughly chopped
2 shallots, roughly chopped
2 Tbsp cider vinegar
6 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
A few splashes of Thai fish sauce
Salt and pepper to taste

Method
In a large saucepan, add enough water to just cover the yams add a generous pinch of salt and bring to the boil, reduce to a simmer and cook until tender (10 minutes). Be careful not to overcook them or they will break up. When the yams are done, drain them and spread out over a tray to cool down quickly.

While the yams are cooking pulse the jalapenos, coriander, shallots and garlic cloves, add the vinegar and oil. Taste and add a few drops Thai fish sauce, and freshly ground pepper, taste once again and correct if necessary.

Put the yams into a bowl and pour over chilli mixture, toss gently and serve.

 

 

 

 

 

APPLE CAKE

apple cake (640x446)

This is an utterly scrumptious cake as it is overloaded with juicy apples, topped with a light batter and baked until golden – need I say more!

Serves 8-10

Butter or nonstick spray, for greasing pan
6-7 large, tart apples, such as Granny Smiths
3 large eggs
200 g sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
125 g white flour
Ground cinnamon and icing sugar, also to finish

Method

Preheat oven to 180C.

Line the bottom of a 20 cm springform pan with greaseproof paper. Butter the paper and the sides of the pan. Peel, halve and core your apples, then chop them into medium-sized chunks (about 2cm squared). Pile the cut apples directly in the prepared pan.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl, using an electric mixer or whisk, beat eggs with sugar until thick and ribbons form on the surface of the beaten eggs. Beat in vanilla, then stir in flour with a spoon until just combined. The batter will be very thick.

Pour over apples in pan, using a spoon or spatula to spread the batter so that it covers all exposed apples.

Bake in preheated oven for 55 to 60 minutes, or until a tester comes out free of batter. Cool in pan for 10 minutes on rack, then flip out onto another rack, peel off the parchment paper, and flip it back onto a serving platter. Dust lightly with ground cinnamon and icing sugar.

Serve warm or cooled. It goes particularly well with freshly whipped cream.

CRUNCHY BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH CHEESE

brussels sprouts recipe

This is yet another delicious way to eat Brussels sprouts why not try them with a little cheese?

Serves 4-6

24 small brussels sprouts

Knob of butter

1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for rubbing

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1/4 cup grated cheese of your choice (parmesan or aged cheddar works well)

Method

Wash the brussels sprouts well. Trim the stem ends and remove any raggy outer leaves. Cut in half from stem to top and gently rub each half with olive oil, keeping it intact (or if you are lazy just toss them in a bowl with a glug of olive oil).

Heat 1 tablespoon of olive  with knob of butter in your largest fry pan over medium heat. Don’t overheat the fry pan, or the outsides of the brussels sprouts will cook too quickly. Place the brussels sprouts in the pan flat side down (single-layer), sprinkle with a couple pinches of salt, cover, and cook for roughly 5 minutes; the bottoms of the sprouts should only show a hint of browning. Once just tender, uncover, turn up the heat, and cook until the flat sides are deep brown and caramelised. Toss them once or twice to get some browning on the rounded side. Season with more salt, a few grinds of pepper, and a dusting of grated cheese. I suggest eating them straight away!

PIGS

 

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Wessex lop eared saddleback

The time had come for Simon and I to get some pigs and in our typical fashion we saw an add in the local newspaper, talked to our friend and that was pretty much how it happened.  We had 2 weeks to get a pen erected, house built and a quick self-help lesson in pig husbandry.  Actually to be honest my husband Simon has always been keen on getting some rare breed pigs but the time or place hadn’t been right and now that we are settled it just seemed the next step on our journey to getting more and more self sufficient.  We have shared this experience with another chef and dear friend Ed which has been great to feed off information from one to another and to share with costs, food and general up keep.

Simon and Ed built the pen with foraged wooden pallets, some tin and straw.  With a little effort and team work they built a fantastic home for the soon to be housed pigs.  They had a warm, dry house and plenty of room to root, run, wallow and do whatever pigs like to do.  For all of us this was quite a big role to take on and one that we all took very seriously as pigs may not require a daily walk they still require stimulation, they must have routine with a well balanced diet and they like a clean home.  Whoever said pigs were dirty is beyond me!

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BOY AND GIRL (respectively named)

We got two pigs as they are sociable creatures and they like company which for us is hugely important that they are happy!  They were 10 weeks and weighing around 20kg each when they arrived in March and now at the end of May they weigh close to 100kg!! Amazing to see just how fast pigs grow, you can almost see them grow on a daily basis.  We have foraged for food from the many fruit and nut trees which line parks and grow wild throughout the neighbourhood, we now have a pig bucket in the kitchen where all food scraps (except meat) go into, which has been great for us as a family to reduce our waste.  It has taught us so many things since owning the pigs for one don’t under estimate their intelligence and humour.  They keep their house immaculate, they go toilet in pretty much the same place all the time and they love food and foraging.

We feed our pigs twice a day and often throw in plants which have gone to seed, chickweed or any fresh crunchy bits and bobs from our property to give them a little snack, we also found that they adore milk which has been kindly given from the milkman, bread from the baker and scraps from our kitchens.  Well this has been a journey of raring the pigs, it has taught us as a family about the respectful and important role of raring happy, healthy pigs and taking control what they are feed so we know what we are going to be feed!

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Looking back we have learnt a lot about what to do and what not to do.  We advise that getting pigs in winter isn’t much fun for us or them.  Too much rain is a pain for us and them, that is obviously when you can see what destruction pigs can really do to your property and the amount of mud and puddles that can appear from having just 2 pigs.

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Trying to act like a farmer!! Can you tell?

Well the time has come for us to almost say good bye to these intelligent creatures and this is another first for us and one that we are excited about but also a little apprehensive as even though we have distanced ourselves and tried not to get attached you still do have feelings as you do spend a lot of time regularly feeding and mucking them out.  You see little characteristic appear and quirky things they do and you realise just how smart they are. We are now planning our next stage of pig farming and that is pig eating and this is the part where we as chefs turn our skills and passion into respectively preparing our pork and turning it into joints of meats for roasting, brining, curing and preserving.  This is what it is all about…

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Girl

Two weeks left and we are ready for stage 2 ……MEAT!

pig

 

OTAGO FARMERS MARKET – MOBILE KITCHEN MENU 25/05/2013

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Good Morning All,

Cold is an understatement, my hands are freezing!!!! Moroccan Carrot soup is simmering away thanks to the beautiful carrots from Wairuna Organics.  Slow cooked and I mean slow cooked beef cheeks are also on the menu.  You never know quite what you may find at Leckies Meats and low and behold I got my hands on some succulent beef cheeks! They are such great value and if treated with respect and allowing plenty of time you will find them rewarding, just ensure that you cook them until they are on the verge of falling apart!  I am also mixing up autumnal ingredients with a good dressing to liven up our salad range through these colder months.  Cabbage is such a versatile vegetable and one that loves being cooked, stuffed and eaten raw and when dressed with a creamy, irresistible dressing such as the buttermilk one today you will find yourself using this dressing drizzled over almost everything and maybe even consuming more cabbage??

I don’t very often have croissants left over but when I do I find they make such a fantastic bread and butter pudding type dessert.  I added some apples to lift it in flavour and to lighten it in texture.  Delicious!!

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Have a great day and look out for Dish magazine it is quite a spread I have heard ,and you might even recognise some people….

CABBAGE SALAD WITH BUTTERMILK DRESSING

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I love buttermilk and when combined in a dressing it becomes quite decadent.  It is easy to create yourself by adding 1 tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice to 1 cup of milk or cream.  Let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes and use as desired!

Serves 4

Dressing

½ cup buttermilk

2 Tbsp mayonnaise

2 Tbsp cider vinegar

1 tsp sugar

Salad

½ savoy cabbage, cored and thinly sliced

¼ green or red cabbage, cored and thinly sliced

½ red onion, finely diced

1 carrot, grated coarsely

2 celery sticks, peeled and thinly sliced

Handful parsley, roughly chopped

1 cup of stale bread (ideally from whole loaf)

2 tbsp olive oil

1 lemon, juice

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method

Whisk together buttermilk, mayonnaise, vinegar, onion, sugar, pinch of salt, and generous grind of pepper in a bowl until sugar has dissolved. Set aside in fridge.

Preheat oven to 190C

Rip the stale bread into small chunks and toss in the oil.  Sprinkle over a little salt and combine well.  Place onto a baking tray and spread out.  Bake until golden and crunchy (about 10 minutes). Cool.

Toss cabbage, carrot, onion, celery and ½ the parsley together and place into bowl.  Scatter over the croutons and drizzle the buttermilk dressing generously over the salad.  Sprinkle over the last of the parsley, a grind or two of pepper and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Serve!

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BRAISED BEEF CHEEKS

Beef cheeks are a cut of meat that I am always on the lookout for and it just happens that Leckies Butcher has a secret stash!  They need moisture when cooked and long and slow.  The meat should be meltingly tender when consumed!

Serves 8

2 beef cheeks

4 Tbsp olive oil

1 carrot, peeled and roughly chopped

1 onion, diced

1/2 bulb of garlic, cut across the middle

1 stick celery, chopped

1 leek, chopped

4 sprigs thyme

12 black peppercorns

2 Tbsp tomato purée

1 bottles red wine

1 litres chicken stock

1 splash balsamic vinegar

1 splash Worcestershire sauce

Method

Preheat oven 150C

Trim the beef cheeks and remove as much sinew as possible. Cut each cheek in half. Season well with salt and pepper. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a heavy-based pan and brown the cheeks on all sides. Remove and set aside.

Add the vegetables, garlic and a little extra oil if necessary. Stir around until they turn golden. Add the thyme and peppercorns and mix everything together. When all the vegetables are golden, add the tomato paste and cook for 2 minutes.

Pour in the red wine and stir, scraping up all the sticky bits from the bottom of the pan, then cook until the liquid is reduced and you have a sticky sauce – about 12-14 minutes.

Put the beef cheeks back in the pan and cover with the chicken stock. Bring to the boil, skim the surface and cover with a circle of greaseproof paper. Place in the oven and braise the beef in the oven at 150C for 2 hours 30 minutes or until tender.

Once the cheeks are cooked add a splash each of balsamic vinegar and Worcestershire sauce. Carve the cheeks into smaller portions if necessary.

These are great served with soft parmesan polenta with the juice poured over the top.

SPINACH AND CHICKPEAS

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This is so delicious, it reminds me of lazy days in the sun eating Tapas.  The technique with the bread may seem a little odd but it works well and the combination of chickpeas and spinach is a classic!

Serves 4                                                                   

6 tbsp olive oil

3 slices white bread, crusts removed, cubed or torn

3 cloves garlic thinly sliced

1 tsp ground cumin

1 Tbsp red wine or sherry vinegar

800 g tinned chickpeas rinsed and drained

450 g fresh spinach

Freshly ground salt and black pepper

Method

Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy-based frying pan over a medium heat.

Add the bread and fry for 5 minutes until golden brown on all sides. Add the garlic and cumin and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the garlic is nutty brown.

Transfer to a pestle and mortar or food processor. Add the vinegar and mash or process to a paste.

Return the bread paste to the pan and add the drained chick peas.
Cook, stirring, until the chick peas have absorbed the flavours and are hot, then season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper. If the consistency is a little thick, add some water. Now add the spinach and cook until just wilted, around 2 minutes. Check the seasoning and serve.

John Gilchrist Willowbrook Orchard

John Gilchrist
Willowbrook Orchard

APPLE AND CROISSANT PUDDING

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Serves 4-6

500 ml full fat milk

300 ml cream

1 vanilla pod, split lengthways or a drop or two of vanilla extract

1 cinnamon stick

3 eggs

3 egg yolks

200 g sugar

2 Tbsp butter, melted

2 stale but not too stale croissants, halved horizontally

2 apples, halved, cored and roughly chopped

Method

Preheat the oven to 200C/180C fan and grease a large pie dish or baking. Put the milk, cream, vanilla and cinnamon in a saucepan over medium heat and bring to the boil.
Put the whole eggs, egg yolks and sugar in a mixer or in a mixing bowl using an electric whisk and whisk until pale and fluffy. Slowly pour the boiled cream into the egg mixture, whisking vigorously until evenly incorporated.

Pass the mixture through a fine sieve and discard the vanilla bean, cinnamon stick and any bits of egg shell that may have accidentally crept in.

Brush the melted butter over the croissants and arrange them in the prepared pie dish or baking pan. Scatter the apples over the croissants in the pan, then pour the custard in over the top.

Using a spatula, press down the croissants so that they start to soak up some of the lovely custard mixture. Bake in the preheated oven for 25 minutes. It should still be a little runny in the middle.

Serve with vanilla ice cream, or just some whipped cream flavoured with a little lemon and vanilla extract.

Alison would like to thank the following vendors for their fantastic produce

SUNRISE BAKERY – fresh baked goods

KAKANUI PRODUCE – cabbage and capsicum

LECKIES BUTCHER – beef cheeks

WILLOWBROOK ORCHARD – variety of apples and pears

BRYDONE ORGANICS – organic spinach

WAIRUNA ORGANICS – organic carrots

JUDGE ROCK WINES – central Otago wines

 

 

APPLE AND CROISSANT PUDDING

IMG_4281 (640x285) (2)

serves 4-6

500 ml full fat milk

300 ml cream

1 vanilla pod, split lengthways or a drop or two of vanilla extract

1 cinnamon stick

3 eggs

3 egg yolks

200 g sugar

2 Tbsp butter, melted

2 stale but not too stale croissants, halved horizontally

2 apples, halved, cored and roughly chopped

Method

Preheat the oven to 200C/180C fan and grease a large pie dish or baking. Put the milk, cream, vanilla and cinnamon in a saucepan over medium heat and bring to the boil.
Put the whole eggs, egg yolks and sugar in a mixer or in a mixing bowl using an electric whisk and whisk until pale and fluffy. Slowly pour the boiled cream into the egg mixture, whisking vigorously until evenly incorporated.

Pass the mixture through a fine sieve and discard the vanilla bean, cinnamon stick and any bits of egg shell that may have accidentally crept in.

Brush the melted butter over the croissants and arrange them in the prepared pie dish or baking pan. Scatter the apples over the croissants in the pan, then pour the custard in over the top.

Using a spatula, press down the croissants so that they start to soak up some of the lovely custard mixture. Bake in the preheated oven for 25 minutes. It should still be a little runny in the middle.

Serve with vanilla ice cream, or just some whipped cream flavoured with a little lemon and vanilla extract.

 

SPINACH AND CHICKPEAS

IMG_4525 (640x427)

This is so delicious, it reminds me of lazy days in the sun eating Tapas.  The technique with the bread may seem a little odd but it works well and the combination of chickpeas and spinach is a classic!

Serves 4                                                                   

6 tbsp olive oil

3 slices white bread, crusts removed, cubed or torn

3 cloves garlic thinly sliced

1 tsp ground cumin

1 Tbsp red wine or sherry vinegar

800 g tinned chickpeas rinsed and drained

450 g fresh spinach

Freshly ground salt and black pepper

Method

Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy-based frying pan over a medium heat.

Add the bread and fry for 5 minutes until golden brown on all sides. Add the garlic and cumin and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the garlic is nutty brown.

Transfer to a pestle and mortar or food processor. Add the vinegar and mash or process to a paste.

Return the bread paste to the pan and add the drained chick peas.
Cook, stirring, until the chick peas have absorbed the flavours are hot, then season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper. If the consistency is a little thick, add some water. Now add the spinach and cook until just wilted, around 2 minutes. Check the seasoning and serve.

BRAISED BEEF CHEEKS

 

Beef cheeks are a cut of meat that I am always on the lookout for and it just happens that Leckies Butcher has a secret stash!  They need moisture when cooked and long and slow.  The meat should be meltingly tender when consumed!

Serves 8

2 beef cheeks

4 Tbsp olive oil

1 carrot, peeled and roughly chopped

1 onion, diced

1/2 bulb of garlic, cut across the middle

1 stick celery, chopped

1 leek, chopped

4 sprigs thyme

12 black peppercorns

2 Tbsp tomato purée

1 bottles red wine

1 litres chicken stock

1 splash balsamic vinegar

1 splash Worcestershire sauce

Method

Preheat oven 150C

Trim the beef cheeks and remove as much sinew as possible. Cut each cheek in half. Season well with salt and pepper. Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a heavy-based pan and brown the cheeks on all sides. Remove and set aside.

Add the vegetables, garlic and a little extra oil if necessary. Stir around until they turn golden. Add the thyme and peppercorns and mix everything together. When all the vegetables are golden, add the tomato paste and cook for 2 minutes.

Pour in the red wine and stir, scraping up all the sticky bits from the bottom of the pan, then cook until the liquid is reduced and you have a sticky sauce – about 12-14 minutes.

Put the beef cheeks back in the pan and cover with the chicken stock. Bring to the boil, skim the surface and cover with a circle of greaseproof paper. Place in the oven and braise the beef in the oven at 150C for 2 hours 30 minutes or until tender.

Once the cheeks are cooked add a splash each of balsamic vinegar and Worcestershire sauce. Carve the cheeks into smaller portions if necessary.

These are great served with soft parmesan polenta with the juice poured over the top.

 

 

 

MOROCCAN CARROT SOUP

The humble carrot, combined with warming spices works a treat in this soup!

Serves 4-6

2Tbsp butter

1 onion, sliced thinly

1 kg carrots, peeled and roughly chopped

600 ml chicken or veg stock

1 ½ tsp cumin seeds

½ tsp fennel seeds

1Tbsp honey

1tsp fresh lemon juice

pinch ground allspice

1/2 cup plain yogurt, stirred to loosen

METHOD

Melt butter in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion; sauté 2 minutes. Mix in carrots. Add broth; bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer until carrots are very tender, about 20 minutes.

Stir cumin seeds in small frypan over medium-high heat until fragrant, 4 to 5 minutes; cool. Finely grind in spice mill.

Remove soup from heat. Puree in batches in blender or whatever method works, until smooth. Return to same pan. Whisk in honey, lemon juice, and allspice. Season with salt and pepper.

Ladle soup into bowls. Drizzle yogurt over; sprinkle generously with cumin.