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otago farmers market mobile kitchen menu – 31/08/2013

 

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Well we missed the snow which is a blessing for all.  The menu today is wild and full of flavour.  We start with fresh succulent salmon from Harbour Fish, not only will I be teaming it up with the first sweet Savoy Cabbage (from Byrdone Organics) I will be showing you how to best cook it with some simple techniques a few great items to season it up with.

I also have the joy of Basecamps ‘Award Winning’ venison salami.  I will be infusing a hearty satisfying soup and also we will be playing around with other dishes you can easily incorporate this amazing product in. Wairuna Organics still have carrots and this very quick salad is another great recipe to have up your sleeve as it takes minutes to prepare and very few ingredients. 

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Of course every week I have a little something sweet to finish with and this weeks cake is a winner.  Sweet, ruby red beetroot baked in simple cake and doused heavily with syrup.  This cake certainly won’t be dry and it lasts well.  Don’t be put off by the fact that you are putting beetroot into a cake, it gives the cake a very subtle almost plum like flavour.

Have a great weekend and happy Fathers Day to all the great Dads out their we love you!

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SEARED SALMON, SAVOY CABBAGE AND LEMON DRESSING

Serves 4

For the dressing

lemon, zest and juice only

3 Tbsp olive oil

2 spring onions, thinly sliced

2 Tbsp chopped flatleaf parsley

Sea salt flakes and cracked pepper

For the wilted vegetables

1 Tbsp olive oil

300g savoy cabbage, finely sliced

1 tsp dill, chopped roughly

1 Tbsp butter

For the salmon

1 Tbsp olive oil

4 x salmon fillets, skin-on

1 lemon, zest and juice only

1 Tbsp butter

Method

For the dressing: Place half the lemon zest and all the juice into a bowl, gradually whisk in the olive oil, whisking continuously. Stir in the spring onions and parsley, season with salt and black pepper and set aside.

For the cabbage: Melt the butter in suitable sized pot or pan, add the sliced cabbage, season with generous amount of pepper and salt, and add the fresh dill, mix through and lightly cover with lid.  Cook for 3-5 minutes or until cabbage has just wilted, yet still has vibrant colour and still crispy.

For the salmon: Preheat a frying pan over a medium-high heat. Rub the olive oil into the salmon skin then place then place the salmon into the hot pan, skin-side down.

Season the salmon with salt and black pepper. Cook for 2-3 minutes, until the skin is crisp and golden brown, then turn the salmon. Add the butter, lemon juice and zest to the pan and cook for a further 1-2 minutes, or until cooked to your liking.

Serve the salmon with the cabbage and spoon a little dressing over the fish.

 

AWARD WINNING BASECAMP REDWINE VENISON SALAMI WITH CABBAGE AND BEANS

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Basecamps salami are best eaten natural, but when the weather still has that nip in the air you want a little more comfort in your diet and this is where this dish comes in.

This dish can double as a thick hearty soup or stew.  The combination of simple yet outstanding ingredients make this dish truly memorable.

Serves 6-8

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 onion, sliced thinly

200-300g salami (basecamp red wine and cracked pepper smoked venison salami)

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 ½ cups white wine

1 425g can of white beans (cannellini or haricot), drained

2 liters vegetable or chicken stock

1 lite water (approx.)

1 tsp salt, more to taste

300-500g savoy cabbage, quartered, then sliced into 4mm thick slices

2 bay leaves

To serve

1 cup chopped parsley, loosely packed

½ cup, freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Method

Heat the olive oil on medium-high heat in a large thick-bottomed pot. Add the salami, cutting it up into pieces as you put it into the pot in a single layer. When the salami has nicely browned, remove it with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Add the onion and sauté for 3-4 minutes, stirring often. Add the garlic and cook for another 1-2 minutes.

Add the white wine and the beans and bring to a rolling boil. Reduce to a simmer. Cover and cook for 10 minutes. If you want, for a thicker base, use an blender or potato masher to blend some (or all) of the beans and onions.

Add the water, stock, salt, cabbage, bay leaves and browned salami. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes, then uncover and continue cooking until the cabbage is tender, about another 10-20 minutes.

To serve, sprinkle on chopped parsley and grated cheese.

 

BEETROOT CAKE

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This cake is ruby red in colour and deep and rich in flavour.  It is a similar to a carrot cake in technique but more like a syrup cake in texture.

Serves 6-8

50g butter

100ml oil

200g soft brown sugar

200g self-raising flour

1 tsp baking powder

2 eggs

300g grated raw beetroot

1 medium apple (75g) grated

½ tsp mixed spice

75g toasted walnuts or hazelnuts (optional)

Zest of one orange

Glaze

200ml water

150g caster sugar

Method

Pre heat the oven to 180C

Heat the butter in a small pot until it browns and smells nutty. Add the oil, mix and leave to cool.

Whisk the eggs and sugar until pale and thick. Continue whisking and gradually pour in the oil and butter mixture so that it thickens up and emulsifies.

Sift the flour, baking powder and spice together and fold through the egg mixture.

Add the grated carrot and apple and remaining ingredients and mix gently together until just combined.  Pour into a greased and lined tin. Bake for 40 minutes – 1 hour (or until a skewer comes out clean).

To make the syrup – heat the sugar and water in a small pot until the sugar dissolves.

Prick the cake all over with a skewer or fork and douse with the syrup so that the cake soaks it all up, this will add not only flavour but moisture.

Serve simply with natural yoghurt.

It will keep for at least 4 days.

 

QUICK CARROT SALAD

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It is always great to have a few quick ideas up your sleeve and carrots are great for this.  This simple little salad can be served with most things, and it’s a great platform for adding other tasty ingredients.

Serves 4-6

500g carrots, coarsely grated

3 tablespoons rice vinegar

1 Tbsp caster sugar

salt to taste

a thumb of ginger, peeled and finely grated

Method

Combine rice vinegar, sugar and ginger. Pour over the grated carrot and add salt to taste. Stir to combine and serve.

 

ALISON WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING VENDORS FOR THEIR OUTSTANDING PRODUCE.

BASECAMP SALALMI – award winning red wine and cracked pepper smoked venison salami

HARBOUR FISH – salmon

MCARTHUR BERRIES – beetroot

BRYDONE ORGANICS – savoy cabbage

GILBERTS FINE FOODS – freshly baked bread

WAIRUNA ORGANICS – carrots

QUICK CARROT SALAD

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It is always great to have a few quick ideas up your sleeve and carrots are great for this.  This simple little salad can be served with most things, and it’s a great platform for adding other tasty ingredients.

Serves 4-6

500g carrots, coarsely grated

3 tablespoons rice vinegar

1 Tbsp caster sugar

salt to taste

a thumb of ginger, peeled and finely grated

Method

Combine rice vinegar, sugar and ginger. Pour over the grated carrot and add salt to taste. Stir to combine and serve.

AWARD WINNING BASECAMP REDWINE VENISON SALAMI WITH CABBAGE AND BEANS

IMG_2829 (427x640)

Basecamps salami are best eaten natural, but when the weather still has that nip in the air you want a little more comfort in your diet and this is where this dish comes in.

This dish can double as a thick hearty soup or stew.  The combination of simple yet outstanding ingredients make this dish truly memorable.

Serves 6-8

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 onion, sliced thinly

200-300g salami (basecamp red wine and cracked pepper smoked venison salami)

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 ½ cups white wine

1 425g can of white beans (cannellini or haricot), drained

2 liters vegetable or chicken stock

1 lite water (approx.)

1 tsp salt, more to taste

300-500g savoy cabbage, quartered, then sliced into 4mm thick slices

2 bay leaves

To serve

1 cup chopped parsley, loosely packed

½ cup, freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Method

Heat the olive oil on medium-high heat in a large thick-bottomed pot. Add the salami, cutting it up into pieces as you put it into the pot in a single layer. When the salami has nicely browned, remove it with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Add the onion and sauté for 3-4 minutes, stirring often. Add the garlic and cook for another 1-2 minutes.

Add the white wine and the beans and bring to a rolling boil. Reduce to a simmer. Cover and cook for 10 minutes. If you want, for a thicker base, use an blender or potato masher to blend some (or all) of the beans and onions.

Add the water, stock, salt, cabbage, bay leaves and browned salami. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes, then uncover and continue cooking until the cabbage is tender, about another 10-20 minutes.

To serve, sprinkle on chopped parsley and grated cheese.

 

SEARED SALMON, SAVOY CABBAGE AND LEMON DRESSING

salmon

Serves 4

For the dressing

lemon, zest and juice only

3 Tbsp olive oil

2 spring onions, thinly sliced

2 Tbsp chopped flatleaf parsley

Sea salt flakes and cracked pepper

For the wilted vegetables

1 Tbsp olive oil

300g savoy cabbage, finely sliced

1 tsp dill, chopped roughly

1 Tbsp butter

For the salmon

1 Tbsp olive oil

4 x salmon fillets, skin-on

1 lemon, zest and juice only

1 Tbsp butter

Method

For the dressing: Place half the lemon zest and all the juice into a bowl, gradually whisk in the olive oil, whisking continuously. Stir in the spring onions and parsley, season with salt and black pepper and set aside.

For the cabbage: Melt the butter in suitable sized pot or pan, add the sliced cabbage, season with generous amount of pepper and salt, and add the fresh dill, mix through and lightly cover with lid.  Cook for 3-5 minutes or until cabbage has just wilted, yet still has vibrant colour and still crispy.

For the salmon: Preheat a frying pan over a medium-high heat. Rub the olive oil into the salmon skin then place then place the salmon into the hot pan, skin-side down.

Season the salmon with salt and black pepper. Cook for 2-3 minutes, until the skin is crisp and golden brown, then turn the salmon. Add the butter, lemon juice and zest to the pan and cook for a further 1-2 minutes, or until cooked to your liking.

Serve the salmon with the cabbage and spoon a little dressing over the fish.

 

BEETROOT CAKE

 

beetroot syrup cake (427x640)

This cake is ruby red in colour and deep and rich in flavour.  It is a similar to a carrot cake in technique but more like a syrup cake in texture.

Serves 6-8

50g butter

100ml oil

200g soft brown sugar

200g self-raising flour

1 tsp baking powder

2 eggs

300g grated raw beetroot

1 medium apple (75g) grated

½ tsp mixed spice

75g toasted walnuts or hazelnuts (optional)

Zest of one orange

Glaze

200ml water

150g caster sugar

Method

Pre heat the oven to 180C

Heat the butter in a small pot until it browns and smells nutty. Add the oil, mix and leave to cool.

Whisk the eggs and sugar until pale and thick. Continue whisking and gradually pour in the oil and butter mixture so that it thickens up and emulsifies.

Sift the flour, baking powder and spice together and fold through the egg mixture.

Add the grated carrot and apple and remaining ingredients and mix gently together until just combined.  Pour into a greased and lined tin. Bake for 40 minutes – 1 hour (or until a skewer comes out clean).

To make the syrup – heat the sugar and water in a small pot until the sugar dissolves.

Prick the cake all over with a skewer or fork and douse with the syrup so that the cake soaks it all up, this will add not only flavour but moisture.

Serve simply with natural yoghurt.

It will keep for at least 4 days.

 

otago farmers market mobile kitchen menu 24/08/2013

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Good morning all.

Well the menu today seems to be highlighting the often overlooked beetroot.  I will be turning Wairuna Organics sweet beetroot into moist tasty rissoles, adding them to a wicked market salad combing Origin Beefs new product – Beef Bacon which goes perfectly with the sweet beetroot, peppery watercress from Aquarius gardens, some wild west wasabi (freshly grated horseradish) from Kutash Organics and a good dressing from me!

Produce around the market is up and down from now until October.  What you may be expecting to be there may not be this week until new season growth kicks in.  Brydone Organics have lots of cauliflowers, and now savoy cabbage.  So don’t despair this is just the way nature goes and before you know it we will be biting into new season asparagus and potatoes. 

Keep experimenting with ingredients, add plenty of herbs and keep it simple.

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I also have the delicious pear fritters with strained yoghurt which is quite something.  The pears have been fabulous this year and they add a lovely floral, juicy note to these puffy fritters.  The strained yoghurt is nothing new but it adds such a creamy, tart note to this dish that you will wonder why you don’t strain yoghurt more often.  Today I will be using Rosedale Orchards Pears)

Have a great day whatever you are doing, do come by the mobile kitchen and say hi, grab a bite to eat, get a recipe and get inspired.

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BEETROOT RISSOLES

I like to serve these with some refreshing Greek yoghurt mixed with a little garlic, lemon and chopped dill

Serves 4

200g fresh beetroot, cooked, peeled and coarsely grated
2 spring onions, finely chopped
3 Tbsp parmesan, grated
240g feta cheese, crumbled or try a curd or goats cheese
1 egg, beaten
2 Tbsp dill, finely chopped
2 Tbsp mint or parsley, finely chopped
220g breadcrumbs/ gluten free crumbs
60g plain flour/gluten free flour
vegetable oil, for frying
1 lemon
Salt and black pepper

Method

Mix the beetroot, spring onions, cheese, egg and herbs together. Season, then mix in enough breadcrumbs to bind the mixture. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Shape the mixture into small manadarinl-size pieces, adding a little flour if the mixture is too wet.

Season the flour and coat the balls in it. Heat the oil until hot, but not smoking, and fry the rissoles in batches for 2-3 minutes until golden all over. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels. Serve hot with a squeeze of lemon and yoghurt sauce

 

WATERCRESS, BEETROOT AND BEEF BACON SALAD

Yes I did say ‘beef bacon’ this is a new product from Origin Beef, although inspired by the Jewish in America who of course cannot consume bacon as we know it! This is a product to experiment with as it adds so much flavour and texture to any dish.

Serves 4

150g beetroot, cooked until tender and peeled

Dressing

4 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

1 tsp Dijon mustard

Salad

100g  watercress

1 red onion, sliced into thin rounds (if possible)

50g chopped walnuts

100g Origin Beef-Bacon

50g crème fraiche or soured cream

½ – 1 tsp wild west wasabi (grated fresh horseradish available from Kutash organics)

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method

Cover the beetroot well with cold water and bring to the boil, cook until the beetroot is tender right through (depending size about 30-40 minutes).  Drain and cool, peel off outer skin with your hands. Cut the beetroot into thin rounds and place into large serving platter.

Make dressing and pour over beetroot whilst assembling remainder of salad.  Set aside.

Heat a large fry pan up to hot, drizzle a little oil over the beef-bacon and fry quickly for a minute and then turn, season lightly with sea salt and remove from the heat and rest until you have assembled the salad.

For the salad, gently wash the watercress in cold water, removing excess stalks. Scatter the watercress over the beetroot and then places the beef bacon slices on top, add the red onion, walnuts and season lightly with sea salt and freshly ground pepper.  Add small blobs of crème fraiche mixed with the horseradish.

Serve immediately.

 

CRUSTED SWEDE AND PUMPKIN

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This is a great way to liven up these hardy vegetables, and they make a fantastic vegetarian option.

Serves 4

300g pumpkin, skin removed

300g swede, skin removed

½ cup grated Parmesan

3 Tbsp dried white breadcrumbs

6 Tbsp finely chopped parsley

2 ½ tsp finely chopped thyme

Grated zest of 2 large lemons

2 cloves garlic

Salt and white pepper

¼ cup olive oil

½ cup sour cream

1 Tbsp chopped dill and a handful of watercress

Method

Preheat the oven to 180C. Cut the pumpkin and swede into ½ cm thick slices and lay them flat, cut-side down, on a baking sheet that has been lined with parchment paper.

Mix together in a small bowl the Parmesan, breadcrumbs, parsley, thyme, half the lemon zest, the garlic, a tiny amount of salt (remember, the Parmesan is salty) and some pepper.

Brush the swede and pumpkin generously with olive oil and sprinkle with the crust mix, making sure the slices are covered with a nice, thick coating. Gently pat the mix down a little.

Place the pan in the oven and roast for about 30 minutes, or until the swede and pumpkin are tender: stick a little knife in one wedge to make sure it has softened and is cooked through. If the topping starts to darken too much during cooking, cover loosely with foil.

Mix the sour cream with the dill and some salt and pepper. Serve the wedges warm, sprinkled with the remaining lemon zest, with the sour cream on the side.

 

PEAR FRITTERS, STRAINED YOGHURT AND HONEY

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Pears seem to be extra sweet and extra juicy this season.  Try them served alongside strained yoghurt as it adds a luxurious note to this already divine pudding (it does however work just as beautifully with Greek yoghurt).

SERVES 4

350g Greek yoghurt

Pinch of salt

For the batter
65g plain white flour (or gluten free)
65g cornflour
200ml cold soda water

Sunflower oil, for frying
3 medium firm pears, peeled and cut into wedges (1cm)
4 tsp runny honey

1 lemon, juice

Method
I allow a good day in advance to strain yoghurt.  The idea behind this is to remove any excess moisture and to create a thick creamy paste which holds together. Place the yoghurt in a bowl and add a pinch of salt. Stir to combine and place in the center of clean piece of muslin or a suitable cloth which will allow the liquid to filter through, wrap into a ball and secure tightly with string. This now needs to hang – I used a chopstick, which fitted over a deep bowl.

The next day divide the strained yoghurt into four balls (about 50g each).

To make the batter – Put the cornflour and flour in a large bowl. Whisk in the soda water, stirring constantly, until the mix is smooth and runny, then sit the bowl in the fridge and leave for at least 10 minutes.

Pour enough oil into a medium saucepan so that it comes 5cm up the sides, and place over a medium-high heat. To test that the oil is the right temperature, put in a few drops of batter: if they sink to the bottom, then bounce straight back up with large bubbles, it’s ready. Dip a couple of pears in the batter and lower carefully into the oil. Fry for two to three minutes, until crisp, remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to a kitchen paper-lined plate. Repeat with the remaining pears. Serve the fritters with the yoghurt balls, a squeeze of lemon, and a drizzle of honey.

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ALISON WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING VENDORS FOR THEIR FANTASTIC PRODUCE

JANE FIELD HYDROPONICS – fresh dill

GODDARDS – swede

ORIGIN BEEF – beef bacon

KUSTASH ORGANICS – wild wild west wasabi  (freshly grated horseradish)

AQUARIUS GARDENS – watercress

WAIRUNA ORGANICS – beetroot

ROSEDALE ORCHARDS – pears

SUNRISE BAKERY – fresh baked goods

BRYDONE ORGANCIS – pumpkin

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PEAR FRITTERS, STRAINED YOGHURT AND HONEY

yoghurt with pears (627x640)

Pears seem to be extra sweet and extra juicy this season. 

Try them served alongside strained yoghurt as it adds a luxurious note to this already divine pudding (it does however work just as beautifully with Greek yoghurt).

SERVES 4

350g Greek yoghurt

Pinch of salt

For the batter
65g plain white flour (or gluten free)
65g cornflour
200ml cold soda water

Sunflower oil, for frying
3 medium firm pears, peeled and cut into wedges (1cm)
4 tsp runny honey

1 lemon, juice

Method
I allow a good day in advance to strain yoghurt.  The idea behind this is to remove any excess moisture and to create a thick creamy paste which holds together. Place the yoghurt in a bowl and add a pinch of salt. Stir to combine and place in the center of clean piece of muslin or a suitable cloth which will allow the liquid to filter through, wrap into a ball and secure tightly with string. This now needs to hang – I used a chopstick, which fitted over a deep bowl.

The next day divide the strained yoghurt into four balls (about 50g each).

To make the batter – Put the cornflour and flour in a large bowl. Whisk in the soda water, stirring constantly, until the mix is smooth and runny, then sit the bowl in the fridge and leave for at least 10 minutes.

Pour enough oil into a medium saucepan so that it comes 5cm up the sides, and place over a medium-high heat. To test that the oil is the right temperature, put in a few drops of batter: if they sink to the bottom, then bounce straight back up with large bubbles, it’s ready. Dip a couple of pears in the batter and lower carefully into the oil. Fry for two to three minutes, until crisp, remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to a kitchen paper-lined plate. Repeat with the remaining pears. Serve the fritters with the yoghurt balls, a squeeze of lemon, and a drizzle of honey.

Otago Farmers Market Mobile Kitchen Menu 17/08/2013

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Balmy weather and fantastic produce is a great combination for creating.  As you know I love to make salads, I love combining textures, seasonal flavours and mixing it up with a punchy dressing.  Todays salad is just that, I have added cauliflower as broccoli is thinning a little to spread it out.  I also love to make rich, comforting stews and when I heard we had wild venison at the market I started to imagine all the dishes we could make.  I will be using Red Tussocks diced stewing venison for my simple stew recipe.  I thought we should start slow and enjoy the benefits of this tasty cut combined with some seasonal veg and allowing plenty of time to really cook this fine cut of meat and to allow the deep flavours and tender texture develop.  Spinach is appearing again and Jane Field Hydroponics spinach is crisp, vibrantly green and simple to use.  I will be doing a light and refreshing little dish to accompany any number of dishes and I will be adding it to salads and lightly wilting it with garlic.

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BROCCOLI, CAULIFLOWERCHICKPEA AND LEEK SALAD

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With regards to this salad it’s all about textures, the smoky, charred broccoli and cauliflower will add an interesting note to this salad. 

Serves 4-6

150g dry chickpeas, soak overnight or 1x 425g tin

300g broccoli and or cauliflower, cut into florets

1 leek, washed well

10g dill, or fennel tops roughly chopped

Handful parsley, roughly chopped

Pinch chilli flakes

1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed

1 Tbsp tahini (optional)

Grated zest of 1 lemon and juice

200g natural yoghurt

100ml olive oil

Coarse sea salt and black pepper

Method

Soak the chickpeas in lots of cold water for 24 hours. Next day, drain, cover with cold water and simmer for at least an hour, skim any froth that rises to the surface; they’re done when tender but still retaining their shape (40-60 minutes). Drain, add a tablespoon of olive oil and a little salt, and set aside to cool.

Bring a medium pot of lightly salted water to the boil.  Cook the leek for 3 minutes first and then add the cauliflower first and cook for 2 minutes, add the broccoli and cook for a further minute, drain, refresh and set aside on a tray with a clean cloth to drain some more.  Heat a fry pan for a few minutes. Toss the broccoli in two tablespoons of oil and some salt and pepper, then grill for three to four minutes, to char all over, this will add a smoky flavour and wonderful texture to the broccoli, remove and allow to cool. Slice the cooked leek into bite sized rounds.

In a bowl, mix the broccoli, leek, chickpeas and herbs. Add two tablespoons of oil, garlic, pinch of chilli the zest, and half the juice, salt and pepper. Toss, taste and adjust seasoning.

In another bowl whisk the yogurt, two more tablespoons of oil, tahini and the rest of the juice, salt and pepper mix to combine and taste.

To serve I like to place the broccoli and chickpeas onto a platter and then add drizzle over the yoghurt dressing.

 

WARMING OATS

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Oats really are a winter staple, not only do they fill you up, they are economical and they take on any flavour you wish to add.  This recipe is a great base for you to make your own.

Se

¼ tsp ground cinnamon

¼  tsp  salt

3/4  cup rolled oats

1 cup milk and 1 cup water

2/3 cup grated apple

1/3 cup raisins or dried fruit of your choice

2 Tbsp honey, golden or maple syrup

2 Tbsp fresh walnuts or hazelnuts, roughly chopped

Pouring cream for serving (optional)

Method

In a medium saucepan, add the oats and cook over a gentle heat until the oats toast lightly, add 1 cup water and 1 cup milk, cinnamon, and salt; bring to a gentle boil over medium-high heat and cook 3 minutes.

Stir in the grated apple, raisins and 1 tablespoon honey or syrup, cook for a further 3-5 minutes. Divide oats between 2 serving bowls. Drizzle remaining honey over top and sprinkle with nuts. Serve with a little pouring cream if desired!

 

 

OLD-FASHIONED VENISON STEW

With the arrival of RED TUSSOCK, wild venison at the market and the fact that we are in winter I thought I would give you a good old-fashioned venison stew recipe which you can certainly adapt to suit.  Allow time to do the steps well and allow time to cook this incredible venison with the respect it deserves.

Serves 4-8 

2 carrots, roughly chopped

2 onions, roughly chopped

3 celery sticks, roughly chopped

oil and butter, for frying

2 garlic clove, crushed

1kg boned leg or shoulder of venison, cut into large chunks

5 Tbsp flour or (gluten-free) seasoned with salt and pepper

2 Tbsp redcurrant, blackcurrant or grape jelly

450ml dry red wine

450ml beef stock

2 thyme and rosemary sprigs

1 bay leaf

Method

Heat oven to 180C/fan 160C.

Fry the vegetables in a little oil and butter in a heavy-based casserole for 4-5 mins until golden. Tip in the garlic and fry for a further min, then set aside.

Dust the vension with the seasoned flour and coat well, shake off excess flour. Add a little more oil and butter to the pan, then fry the venison over a high heat, stirring now and then, until well browned. Don’t crowd the pan – cook in batches if necessary. Set aside with the vegetables.

Add the jelly and wine to the pan, and bring to the boil, scraping up all the bits that have stuck to the bottom. Pour in the stock, then add the thyme, bay leaf, meat and vegetables. Season if you like and bring to the boil. Cover and transfer to the oven for about 1½ hrs or until tender. Remove from the oven and check the seasoning.

Serve with a creamy mash, wet polenta or mashed carrot and swedes.

SPINACH WITH YOGHURT

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Serves 4 as an accompaniment

1 teaspoon mustard seed (black)

1 teaspoon cumin seeds

300g spinach

440ml yoghurt, unsweetened natural

2 cloves garlic

Pinch sumac (optional)

salt and pepper

1 lemon

Method

Dry fry’ mustard and cumin seeds in a frying pan until they pop. Remove from heat.

Wash and de-stem spinach. Blanch quickly in boiling water, refresh, drain and squeeze out excess water. Chop spinach finely.

Crush garlic and add along with spinach, salt, pepper and spices to the yoghurt. Zest and juice lemon and add to yoghurt.

This goes well with some warm pitas, or perhaps alongside a succulent steak or a hot curry!

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Alison would like to thank the following vendors for their fantastic produce.

JANE FIELD HYDROPONICS – spinach and fresh herbs

GILBERTS FINE FOODS – fresh baked breads and pastries

RED TUSSOCK VENISON – fresh wild vension

BRYDONE ORGANICS – cauliflower and leeks

WILLOWBROOK ORCHARD – apples and pears

JUDGE ROCK WINES – Central Otago Wines

 

 

WARMING OATS

warming oats (640x425)

Oats really are a winter staple, not only do they fill you up, they are economical and they take on any flavour you wish to add.  This recipe is a great base for you to make your own.

Serves 2

¼ tsp ground cinnamon

¼  tsp  salt

3/4  cup rolled oats

1 cup milk and 1 cup water

2/3 cup grated apple

1/3 cup raisins or dried fruit of your choice

2 Tbsp honey, golden or maple syrup

2 Tbsp fresh walnuts or hazelnuts, roughly chopped

Pouring cream for serving (optional)

Method

In a medium saucepan, add the oats and cook over a gentle heat until the oats toast lightly, add 1 cup water and 1 cup milk, cinnamon, and salt; bring to a gentle boil over medium-high heat and cook 3 minutes.

Stir in the grated apple, raisins and 1 tablespoon honey or syrup, cook for a further 3-5 minutes. Divide oats between 2 serving bowls. Drizzle remaining honey over top and sprinkle with nuts. Serve with a little pouring cream if desired!

BROCCOLI, CHICKPEA AND LEEK SALAD

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Broccoli is in abundance at the moment so make the most of this fortunate glut and eat up with this fantastic salad.

Serves 4-6

150g dry chickpeas, soak overnight or 1x 425g tin

300g broccoli, cut into florets

1 leek, washed well

10g dill, or fennel tops roughly chopped

Handful parsley, roughly chopped

Pinch chilli flakes

1 garlic clove, peeled and crushed

1 Tbsp tahini (optional)

Grated zest of 1 lemon and juice

200g natural yoghurt

100ml olive oil

Coarse sea salt and black pepper

Method

Soak the chickpeas in lots of cold water for 24 hours. Next day, drain, cover with cold water and simmer for at least an hour, skim any froth that rises to the surface; they’re done when tender but still retaining their shape (40-60 minutes). Drain, add a tablespoon of olive oil and a little salt, and set aside to cool.

Bring a medium pot of lightly salted water to the boil.  Cook the leek for 3 minutes first and then add the broccoli and cook for a further minute, drain, refresh and set aside on a tray with a clean cloth to drain some more.  Heat a fry pan for a few minutes. Toss the broccoli in two tablespoons of oil and some salt and pepper, then grill for three to four minutes, to char all over, this will add a smoky flavour and wonderful texture to the broccoli, remove and allow to cool. Slice the cooked leek into bite sized rounds.

In a bowl, mix the broccoli, leek, chickpeas and herbs. Add two tablespoons of oil, garlic, pinch of chilli the zest, and half the juice, salt and pepper. Toss, taste and adjust seasoning.

In another bowl whisk the yogurt, two more tablespoons of oil, tahini and the rest of the juice, salt and pepper mix to combine and taste.

To serve I like to place the broccoli and chickpeas onto a platter and then add drizzle over the yoghurt dressing.

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